For over a decade that I’ve been stringing lacrosse sticks, no sidewall string has every really stuck out to me that much as being very impressive. Although some have been better than others, for the most part, sidewall has always just been…sidewall.  HPLaxrosse, which was originally just a rope manufacturer, making all types of different ropes for various needs, saw untapped potential in the lacrosse market.  They set out to come up with a completely new type of sidewall string that I was very impressed with.  To test these new strings out, I used them to string up the sweet Powell Pioneer I dyed and strung with Powell Frontier Mesh.


HP PowerLace has a rough texture similar to most strings but their special coating gives them almost a “waxy” feel, which feels nice a smooth in your hands. They are not actually waxed but are coated in a proprietary material that feels similar. This makes them feel a easier to string than other strings that will tear up your hands during long stringing sessions.  The coating on the strings makes it feels as though it glues to itself when you’re making knots with it.  This means that every knot you string will stay in place and with the exact same tension through the life of the pocket, which is the number one cause of pockets bagging out throughout use and becoming inconsistent. The strings are also quite a bit thinner than most other sidewall string allowing you to fit more of it through a smaller hole, allowing you to more easily wrap the string a few times, making the connection more secure between the mesh and the head. I’ve seen a few people use this stuff as crosslace in trads as well, which I am interested in trying out since they’re soft yet have no stretch at all.  This could lead to a very consistent traditional pocket, that combined with the right leathers, could require little to no adjustment.


HP PowerLace is completely weatherproof and it’s coating is hydrophobic (doesn’t absorb any water), making it great to use in any conditions. I tested them in the rain and water just wicks off of them.  They also claim to have 100% UV protection, so they shouldn’t be weakened by using them in the sun for long periods of time.  Made of military grade threads, HP PowerLace is  extremely strong. HPLaxcrosse says that pound for pound the string is 15x stronger than steel, which is a crazy claim, but obviously I have no way to test that out. They are also very abrasion resistant.  This means that they will last you the full life of your pocket and head.  This is especially beneficially on top strings, which are known to easily wear out and rip due to their constant contact with the ground when scooping up loosies.  Being so strong, you’re also able to really pull down on the string allowing you to string a very tight, perfect pocket that you know won’t become loose over time.


HP PowerLace is made in the USA, which is always great and available in all sorts of lengths including spools and pre-cut segments. They are also very affordable and comparable or cheaper to other performance strings on the market.  The segments are a good length for stringing up heads easily and have aglets on them, making stringing some heads much easier.  My only complaint with these strings is that when you melt the ends, because of the material the strings are made of, don’t melt to create a tip as nicely as standard sidewall does, but they can be done.

HP PowerLace is really a game changer in the stringing industry and I highly recommend them to anyone looking to get the best performance and consistency in their pocket.  The way this stuff hold knots and keep the tension of the string is fantastic.  These strings will last much longer than any other sidewall, saving money, time and frustration in the long run.  These are without a doubt my favorite strings I’ve ever tried and are definitely going in my gamers.

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