RIP Pocket…It’s Been a Good Run

Posted on May 12, 2011 by

Categories: Stringing

As the season is winding down, I’m sure many of you are getting to the end of your pocket’s life.  Can you remember that perfect pocket you had?  Great hold, shot hard, passed accurately, etc. etc.  Fast forward to now.  Are you starting to drop the ball more?  Are your passes sailing depending on the ball you’re using?  Has your shot speed declined?  These are all tell-tale signs of your pocket being TOO OLD.


You can tell that all the coating has come off of this mesh. Once strings start to break, it’s about time.


This pocket looks like it’s in its prime. Once it starts to look more like the other one, it’s time to re-string.

Let me break it down…

New Pocket Pros:
Better hold
Harder shot
Accurate passing

New Pocket Cons:
Pocket will bag out during break-in period
Can lead to inconsistencies if you don’t know how to adjust during break-in period

Old Pocket Pros:
With a new ball, passing will be consistent
Change clause: people hate change – fact.

Old Pocket Cons:
Loss of hold
Loss of power on shot
Loss of accuracy passing

So, how do you combat this and decide?
1. Keep a back up that is broken in already, then break in the newly strung head while you use your back up.

2. Learn to string!  You will have way less troubles if you can adjust your pocket during the break in period.  This enables you to have a pocket with better hold, a faster shot, and more accurate passing.

3. Embrace change.  If the pocket you have is beginning to adversely effect your play, you’re only delaying the inevitable and it could come back to bite you (like your top string breaking during a state semi-final and you’re stuck playing with the #3 d-middie’s back up stick as a starting attackman). The ‘perfect pocket’ is always fleeting: it only lasts a few weeks or months if you are lucky, sometimes only days (especially if you’ve been in some narsty weather.)

I know there are some folks who use a pocket until it’s completely in shambles, but I just flat out disagree with doing that.  If your pocket is dead, you’re putting yourself at a disadvantage.  Learn your pocket, learn your game, get an advantage.  #string.

As always, please send any questions or comments to roseschoolofstringing@gmail.com and visit www.roseschoolofstringing.com to sign up for a stringing workshop near you. We have 2 in Rockville MD coming up May 14th and May 21st with registration still open and another in Fredericksburg VA on May 22nd. Check us out on Facebook and Twitter too!

Posted in: Stringing

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  • http://www.facebook.com/StefanKitzinger Stefan John

    I partially agree here.
    After a good season of use, a pocket will need some maintenance; but I feel if you know what you’re doing with a stringing, there really isn’t a need to buy all new materials and string an entirely new pocket. After a season of use, I actually prefer using the same used materials, and either changing up the sidewall pattern of the stringing (mesh), or just tightening things up if I’m using a more “traditional stringing” (perk- materials are already broken in, don’t need to buy new materials when the used ones still work).
    In my opinion, this takes care of the less hold and slower shot problem for little, if any cost. This is kind of a “preference” thing for lacrosse players though; as I know people who always like to have new materials and mesh, as well as people like myself that like to use materials that are already used/broken in. I can definitely see where each side of the argument are coming from though.
    I will concede that a well strung pocket is always a good idea; as it needs little to no maintenance, and has the potential to last multiple seasons if minor adjustments are made as problems come up.
    On that note, I couldn’t agree more that lacrosse players should at least learn the basics of stringing, and how to consistently string a pocket they like. Being a fellow stick doctor, I know how frustrating it can be when you are the only person who strings on your team or in your area, and everyone bombards you when your warming up for a game to make some minor adjustment to their pocket. Yes, it takes some effort to learn the basics of stringing, but I feel that in the end it is well worth it both for you, and your local stick Dr.

  • http://www.facebook.com/StefanKitzinger Stefan John

    I partially agree here.
    After a good season of use, a pocket will need some maintenance; but I feel if you know what you’re doing with a stringing, there really isn’t a need to buy all new materials and string an entirely new pocket. After a season of use, I actually prefer using the same used materials, and either changing up the sidewall pattern of the stringing (mesh), or just tightening things up if I’m using a more “traditional stringing” (perk- materials are already broken in, don’t need to buy new materials when the used ones still work).
    In my opinion, this takes care of the less hold and slower shot problem for little, if any cost. This is kind of a “preference” thing for lacrosse players though; as I know people who always like to have new materials and mesh, as well as people like myself that like to use materials that are already used/broken in. I can definitely see where each side of the argument are coming from though.
    I will concede that a well strung pocket is always a good idea; as it needs little to no maintenance, and has the potential to last multiple seasons if minor adjustments are made as problems come up.
    On that note, I couldn’t agree more that lacrosse players should at least learn the basics of stringing, and how to consistently string a pocket they like. Being a fellow stick doctor, I know how frustrating it can be when you are the only person who strings on your team or in your area, and everyone bombards you when your warming up for a game to make some minor adjustment to their pocket. Yes, it takes some effort to learn the basics of stringing, but I feel that in the end it is well worth it both for you, and your local stick Dr.

  • FlowhamedalBroseph

    why wpuld you end up having to use a back up d mids stick? ever heard of a back up stick? dude thats like lax 101