Warrior Sports Continues to Promote Drug Culture?

Posted on November 14, 2013 by

Categories: Warrior

Warrior Sports Continues to Promote Drug Culture?

A little over an hour ago, the Warrior Sports Instagram account uploaded a picture (above). Warrior Sports has a lengthy history of glamorizing and suggesting drug use, racy innuendo, and cultural bygones. At first glance, I instantly believed the powder, married with the word “uncut,” to be cocaine. The powder bottle is supposed to resemble a Gold Bond Body Powder bottle, but I don’t think it’s the advert’s saving grace.

“Uncut,” in reference to cocaine, is generally cocaine that isn’t mixed with an additional substance and is considered close to pure cocaine. Of course, the ad could just be in reference to getting a behind-the-scenes look at what goes on at Warrior.

Our opinion? We’re not going to disparage Warrior Sports. We’re not guilty of ads of this nature, but we have definitely posted suggestive things in the past. Warrior is good at what it does – marketing to the masses in eye-catching adverts, promotions, and so forth. The once lacrosse-centric organization is now a multi-sport group who does a great deal to remain appealing.

However, if you’re a parent, then you might have a different notion. People have already expressed opinions in earlier posts (Glory Hole Cleats) on our site about the organization:

The team at Warrior should be embarrassed that their marketing team has sunk to such low levels over the past 2 years. The Warrior team is in such a unique position to not only educate the younger players who they are advertising too but also ask their viewers to rise up and be better… Warrior, shame on you.

and

Way to go Warrior. Congratulations, you’ve perpetuated the douchebag stereotype once again. I’m definitely going to re-evaluate my deciding factors when it’s time to upgrade my hockey and lacrosse gloves and sticks this summer. You are not a company I want to represent.

What are your thoughts about the current picture? What was the picture’s first impression? Would it be acceptable if Nike or Under Armour did this? Leave a comment.

Posted in: Warrior

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  • everyone

    who cares? if you’re old enough understand the joke (the coke is cut with baby powder), it doesnt exactly “promote drug culture”. i think this is being made too big a deal of.

  • everyone

    who cares? if you’re old enough understand the joke (the coke is cut with baby powder), it doesnt exactly “promote drug culture”. i think this is being made too big a deal of.

  • everyone

    who cares? if you’re old enough understand the joke (the coke is cut with baby powder), it doesnt exactly “promote drug culture”. i think this is being made too big a deal of.

  • Max

    Warrior? Drugs? I don’t know what you’re talking about…

  • Max

    Warrior? Drugs? I don’t know what you’re talking about…

  • Max

    Warrior? Drugs? I don’t know what you’re talking about…

  • Max

    Warrior? Drugs? I don’t know what you’re talking about…

  • Max

    Warrior? Drugs? I don’t know what you’re talking about…

  • Max

    Warrior? Drugs? I don’t know what you’re talking about…

  • bentlax33

    I dont think its too big a deal….it is a big deal…it damages our sport every time something like this comes out. I’m still a player…coached at the college level for many years and now im trying to be an ambasador of the game and help geographically expand to new areas….. we dont need these stereotypes as part of our sport. They ve been around our game for years and warrior is only helping to purpetuate them.

  • bentlax33

    I dont think its too big a deal….it is a big deal…it damages our sport every time something like this comes out. I’m still a player…coached at the college level for many years and now im trying to be an ambasador of the game and help geographically expand to new areas….. we dont need these stereotypes as part of our sport. They ve been around our game for years and warrior is only helping to purpetuate them.

  • bentlax33

    I dont think its too big a deal….it is a big deal…it damages our sport every time something like this comes out. I’m still a player…coached at the college level for many years and now im trying to be an ambasador of the game and help geographically expand to new areas….. we dont need these stereotypes as part of our sport. They ve been around our game for years and warrior is only helping to purpetuate them.

  • Rob R.

    Willing to bet that ‘gold bond’ bottle didn’t even make it in to the picture until the last minute as a half assed, c.y.a move. This company has history, but it really doesn’t help advertising the way that they do. The outsiders looking in will always think lacrosse is populated by douche bags and the kids playing (some not all thankfully) will buy into it and think it’s the way to be. Put the party boy stuff to rest, I thought lacrosse was about, y’know, playing lacrosse.

  • 12yearolds

    Warrior’s marketing team is full of the dumbest 12-year old lax bros in the world, and it’s a shame because Warrior makes pretty solid products. All this “shock value” marketing DOES get attention, but it drags down their brand and the sport.

  • 12yearolds

    Warrior’s marketing team is full of the dumbest 12-year old lax bros in the world, and it’s a shame because Warrior makes pretty solid products. All this “shock value” marketing DOES get attention, but it drags down their brand and the sport.

  • Anonymous

    Gentleman, we have to be aware of the fact that our sport is almost synonymous with substance abuse (2nd in the NCAA only behind hockey). You can interpret that how you want but to the public eye, anyone who has never played lacrosse, it looks very bad. With the cases at Duke (innocent), UVa, and Cornells recent hazing incident, the world is only seeing the worst in us. Warrior’s marketing campaigns for the past 5 years, not just last 2, shows a great life of partying. Yes, it’s part of the culture of playing lacrosse, but it shouldn’t used as a recruitment tool by a sports company. I’ve had friends who have never played lacrosse watch Warrior commericals during Memorial Day Weekend and say “this makes lacrosse players look like huge assholes”. Not something to be proud of.

  • Anonymous

    Gentleman, we have to be aware of the fact that our sport is almost synonymous with substance abuse (2nd in the NCAA only behind hockey). You can interpret that how you want but to the public eye, anyone who has never played lacrosse, it looks very bad. With the cases at Duke (innocent), UVa, and Cornells recent hazing incident, the world is only seeing the worst in us. Warrior’s marketing campaigns for the past 5 years, not just last 2, shows a great life of partying. Yes, it’s part of the culture of playing lacrosse, but it shouldn’t used as a recruitment tool by a sports company. I’ve had friends who have never played lacrosse watch Warrior commericals during Memorial Day Weekend and say “this makes lacrosse players look like huge assholes”. Not something to be proud of.

  • Anonymous

    Gentleman, we have to be aware of the fact that our sport is almost synonymous with substance abuse (2nd in the NCAA only behind hockey). You can interpret that how you want but to the public eye, anyone who has never played lacrosse, it looks very bad. With the cases at Duke (innocent), UVa, and Cornells recent hazing incident, the world is only seeing the worst in us. Warrior’s marketing campaigns for the past 5 years, not just last 2, shows a great life of partying. Yes, it’s part of the culture of playing lacrosse, but it shouldn’t used as a recruitment tool by a sports company. I’ve had friends who have never played lacrosse watch Warrior commericals during Memorial Day Weekend and say “this makes lacrosse players look like huge assholes”. Not something to be proud of.

  • Anonymous

    Gentleman, we have to be aware of the fact that our sport is almost synonymous with substance abuse (2nd in the NCAA only behind hockey). You can interpret that how you want but to the public eye, anyone who has never played lacrosse, it looks very bad. With the cases at Duke (innocent), UVa, and Cornells recent hazing incident, the world is only seeing the worst in us. Warrior’s marketing campaigns for the past 5 years, not just last 2, shows a great life of partying. Yes, it’s part of the culture of playing lacrosse, but it shouldn’t used as a recruitment tool by a sports company. I’ve had friends who have never played lacrosse watch Warrior commericals during Memorial Day Weekend and say “this makes lacrosse players look like huge assholes”. Not something to be proud of.

  • Noah_Ayeee

    if I was a parent who was not familiar with lacrosse, Warrior’s visual marketing would turn me away from their equipment. I agree that Warrior is trying to perpetuate a stereotype that is incredibly harmful to the image of lacrosse. There is nothing constructive about their last few advertisements.

    Personally. I have been loyal to both the Revolution and Evolution series of heads for 10 years. But I am not any longer. Last month I purchased a Brine Edge head over the new Revolution 3, specifically because of my feelings towards Warrior’s previous questionable cleat advertisement.

    Grow the game, not the stereotype.

    • laxbuff519

      in their 2013-2014 catalog there are condoms and rolling papers along with silhouettes of strippers

    • laxbuff519

      in their 2013-2014 catalog there are condoms and rolling papers along with silhouettes of strippers

    • laxbuff519

      in their 2013-2014 catalog there are condoms and rolling papers along with silhouettes of strippers

    • laxbuff519

      in their 2013-2014 catalog there are condoms and rolling papers along with silhouettes of strippers

    • laxbuff519

      in their 2013-2014 catalog there are condoms and rolling papers along with silhouettes of strippers

    • laxbuff519

      in their 2013-2014 catalog there are condoms and rolling papers along with silhouettes of strippers

    • Flag Down

      Noah – Hate to burst your bubble, especially since I agree with your stance on this topic, but…. Warrior owns Brine and manufactures all of their products. That money you spent on your Edge is now safely in Dave Morrow’s pocket.

      • Noah_Ayeee

        I am aware of the fact that Brine is owned by Warrior. I assume Dave Morrow see’s all his products as dollars, and values the sales trends of specific brands when distributing marketing budgets. So my point was more about my brand loyalty and choosing the brand I want to represent as a grower of the game.

        I think it is interesting to compare the different approaches to marketing Brine and Warrior products by the same company. I feel like Brine’s marketing provides a more positive and organic light. Which means the company does have some capacity for retaining the values of the original game. But for some reason, the choose to perpetuate the douche bag persona with their Warrior line. Why? Because it flashy, or edgy? I see it as ignorant, and showing no value in a growing the game positively.

        So when I introduce someone to the game of lacrosse, and they ask me what kind of head I use, I can tell them I use a Brine head. Hopefully that, and the discussion that has been raised by the reporting of these issues will will have some part in effecting the Warrior brand’s market share, and cause them to rethink their marketing messages.

      • Noah_Ayeee

        I am aware of the fact that Brine is owned by Warrior. I assume Dave Morrow see’s all his products as dollars, and values the sales trends of specific brands when distributing marketing budgets. So my point was more about my brand loyalty and choosing the brand I want to represent as a grower of the game.

        I think it is interesting to compare the different approaches to marketing Brine and Warrior products by the same company. I feel like Brine’s marketing provides a more positive and organic light. Which means the company does have some capacity for retaining the values of the original game. But for some reason, the choose to perpetuate the douche bag persona with their Warrior line. Why? Because it flashy, or edgy? I see it as ignorant, and showing no value in a growing the game positively.

        So when I introduce someone to the game of lacrosse, and they ask me what kind of head I use, I can tell them I use a Brine head. Hopefully that, and the discussion that has been raised by the reporting of these issues will will have some part in effecting the Warrior brand’s market share, and cause them to rethink their marketing messages.

      • Noah_Ayeee

        I am aware of the fact that Brine is owned by Warrior. I assume Dave Morrow see’s all his products as dollars, and values the sales trends of specific brands when distributing marketing budgets. So my point was more about my brand loyalty and choosing the brand I want to represent as a grower of the game.

        I think it is interesting to compare the different approaches to marketing Brine and Warrior products by the same company. I feel like Brine’s marketing provides a more positive and organic light. Which means the company does have some capacity for retaining the values of the original game. But for some reason, the choose to perpetuate the douche bag persona with their Warrior line. Why? Because it flashy, or edgy? I see it as ignorant, and showing no value in a growing the game positively.

        So when I introduce someone to the game of lacrosse, and they ask me what kind of head I use, I can tell them I use a Brine head. Hopefully that, and the discussion that has been raised by the reporting of these issues will will have some part in effecting the Warrior brand’s market share, and cause them to rethink their marketing messages.

      • Noah_Ayeee

        I am aware of the fact that Brine is owned by Warrior. I assume Dave Morrow see’s all his products as dollars, and values the sales trends of specific brands when distributing marketing budgets. So my point was more about my brand loyalty and choosing the brand I want to represent as a grower of the game.

        I think it is interesting to compare the different approaches to marketing Brine and Warrior products by the same company. I feel like Brine’s marketing provides a more positive and organic light. Which means the company does have some capacity for retaining the values of the original game. But for some reason, the choose to perpetuate the douche bag persona with their Warrior line. Why? Because it flashy, or edgy? I see it as ignorant, and showing no value in a growing the game positively.

        So when I introduce someone to the game of lacrosse, and they ask me what kind of head I use, I can tell them I use a Brine head. Hopefully that, and the discussion that has been raised by the reporting of these issues will will have some part in effecting the Warrior brand’s market share, and cause them to rethink their marketing messages.

  • Noah_Ayeee

    if I was a parent who was not familiar with lacrosse, Warrior’s visual marketing would turn me away from their equipment. I agree that Warrior is trying to perpetuate a stereotype that is incredibly harmful to the image of lacrosse. There is nothing constructive about their last few advertisements.

    Personally. I have been loyal to both the Revolution and Evolution series of heads for 10 years. But I am not any longer. Last month I purchased a Brine Edge head over the new Revolution 3, specifically because of my feelings towards Warrior’s previous questionable cleat advertisement.

    Grow the game, not the stereotype.

  • Nosebreed

    That’s it. Now cocaine is definitely uncool since it is associated with Warrior and their D bag marketing team. So enjoy fellas but count me out. Also their half-assed attempts to wrangle the blonde private school sorority bikini floozies is hilariously lame too. “Dad help I crashed the jeep where’s the Visa” is what sort of sums up “stereotypical” lax culture observed here. Slack jaw, fake tits, and easy major, bring it on. Keep breeding folks. Disregard if this was all a hoax.

  • Nosebreed

    That’s it. Now cocaine is definitely uncool since it is associated with Warrior and their D bag marketing team. So enjoy fellas but count me out. Also their half-assed attempts to wrangle the blonde private school sorority bikini floozies is hilariously lame too. “Dad help I crashed the jeep where’s the Visa” is what sort of sums up “stereotypical” lax culture observed here. Slack jaw, fake tits, and easy major, bring it on. Keep breeding folks. Disregard if this was all a hoax.

  • Nosebreed

    That’s it. Now cocaine is definitely uncool since it is associated with Warrior and their D bag marketing team. So enjoy fellas but count me out. Also their half-assed attempts to wrangle the blonde private school sorority bikini floozies is hilariously lame too. “Dad help I crashed the jeep where’s the Visa” is what sort of sums up “stereotypical” lax culture observed here. Slack jaw, fake tits, and easy major, bring it on. Keep breeding folks. Disregard if this was all a hoax.

  • Nosebreed

    And by ‘Uncut’ are they referring to drugs and or male European porn stars? Both are scummy. Either way how did they get that famous limey ex-footballer to sign on to this s-box advert. Must be out of work, drunk or both.

  • Robert Ford

    People are trying really hard to cry about something since they cant go “oh god warrior is just renaming something again” now that STX is doing it. What a waste of time. Good product, effective marketing, kids who wouldn’t recognize this without adults bringing it up and crying. Good job guys good job. Right up there with the ninja please cries from all the white moms who felt bad cause Chaz posted a complaint.

  • Robert Ford

    People are trying really hard to cry about something since they cant go “oh god warrior is just renaming something again” now that STX is doing it. What a waste of time. Good product, effective marketing, kids who wouldn’t recognize this without adults bringing it up and crying. Good job guys good job. Right up there with the ninja please cries from all the white moms who felt bad cause Chaz posted a complaint.

    • Noah_Ayeee

      It may be true that kids will not recognize it. Whether or not they do though, children are in the impressionable phase of their mental growth. A suggestive ad like this creates positive connotations between the sport of lacrosse and drug use, whether consciously or sub-consciously. For older players it can re-enforce ideas that cocaine is a part of the “lacrosse lifestyle”.

      The attitude you seem to take towards this issue is that is just like any other brand in any other market. The sport of lacrosse is more then just a market for people to sell products though. It’s not a soda. It is a game with a deep history and the possibility of a future rich in growth and inclusion. I think that the vast majority of those that are involved with the sport, and/or truly care about the Game have a problem with this issue and will continue to voice their thoughts on how it should be represented. It’s not just white moms.

      Grow the Game, not the stereotype.

    • Noah_Ayeee

      It may be true that kids will not recognize it. Whether or not they do though, children are in the impressionable phase of their mental growth. A suggestive ad like this creates positive connotations between the sport of lacrosse and drug use, whether consciously or sub-consciously. For older players it can re-enforce ideas that cocaine is a part of the “lacrosse lifestyle”.

      The attitude you seem to take towards this issue is that is just like any other brand in any other market. The sport of lacrosse is more then just a market for people to sell products though. It’s not a soda. It is a game with a deep history and the possibility of a future rich in growth and inclusion. I think that the vast majority of those that are involved with the sport, and/or truly care about the Game have a problem with this issue and will continue to voice their thoughts on how it should be represented. It’s not just white moms.

      Grow the Game, not the stereotype.

      • Robert Ford

        See that’s where you are wrong, it is in fact a place to sell products or you wouldn’t buy them and companies like Nike and Under Armour wouldn’t jump into it. I love the game I want to see respectable play grow but at the same time, their marketing works, their products are top notch and not one person who doesn’t play the sport sees the advertisement to spread the stereotype. Would you prefer the rich kid good guy image? Lets be real here they aren’t any more “good kids” than in public schools but they have more funds. Are they all bad kids no are there alot of bad ones out there yes and does promoting a product in a way that sells affect the image of the brand? Do you still watch the NFL who has multiple drug offenders and spousal abuse convicts, their celebrities so they dont get that title, constantly advertise for their sport. Yeah you do don’t be a hypocrite.

        • Noah_Ayeee

          I haven’t watched much of the NFL this season because I have lost value in it. Unfortunately, it is proving to be another example of profit presiding over the quality of the game and player. So I do not consider myself a hypocrite for my thoughts on this issue. Your argument seems to be “everyone else is doing it” regarding, in this instance, what seems like a reference to cocaine. Yes, there are some NFL players who lack basic morals or common sense. Those are individual players though, not an entire brand. And definitely not one synonymous with the sport. I have met a few of Warrior’s sponsored athletes and don’t think they view drug use or the culture as a cool or positive thing. And I think Warrior should think better when producing advertisements to represent their brand. We do not see Nike, Brine, Under Armour, Maverik, or any of the other major or minor lacrosse brands using the type of marketing in question. And if I did, I would question their values and respect for the Game as well. Just because something negative sells, does not mean it should be done. It’s called integrity.

        • Noah_Ayeee

          I haven’t watched much of the NFL this season because I have lost value in it. Unfortunately, it is proving to be another example of profit presiding over the quality of the game and player. So I do not consider myself a hypocrite for my thoughts on this issue. Your argument seems to be “everyone else is doing it” regarding, in this instance, what seems like a reference to cocaine. Yes, there are some NFL players who lack basic morals or common sense. Those are individual players though, not an entire brand. And definitely not one synonymous with the sport. I have met a few of Warrior’s sponsored athletes and don’t think they view drug use or the culture as a cool or positive thing. And I think Warrior should think better when producing advertisements to represent their brand. We do not see Nike, Brine, Under Armour, Maverik, or any of the other major or minor lacrosse brands using the type of marketing in question. And if I did, I would question their values and respect for the Game as well. Just because something negative sells, does not mean it should be done. It’s called integrity.

        • Noah_Ayeee

          I haven’t watched much of the NFL this season because I have lost value in it. Unfortunately, it is proving to be another example of profit presiding over the quality of the game and player. So I do not consider myself a hypocrite for my thoughts on this issue. Your argument seems to be “everyone else is doing it” regarding, in this instance, what seems like a reference to cocaine. Yes, there are some NFL players who lack basic morals or common sense. Those are individual players though, not an entire brand. And definitely not one synonymous with the sport. I have met a few of Warrior’s sponsored athletes and don’t think they view drug use or the culture as a cool or positive thing. And I think Warrior should think better when producing advertisements to represent their brand. We do not see Nike, Brine, Under Armour, Maverik, or any of the other major or minor lacrosse brands using the type of marketing in question. And if I did, I would question their values and respect for the Game as well. Just because something negative sells, does not mean it should be done. It’s called integrity.

    • Noah_Ayeee

      It may be true that kids will not recognize it. Whether or not they do though, children are in the impressionable phase of their mental growth. A suggestive ad like this creates positive connotations between the sport of lacrosse and drug use, whether consciously or sub-consciously. For older players it can re-enforce ideas that cocaine is a part of the “lacrosse lifestyle”.

      The attitude you seem to take towards this issue is that is just like any other brand in any other market. The sport of lacrosse is more then just a market for people to sell products though. It’s not a soda. It is a game with a deep history and the possibility of a future rich in growth and inclusion. I think that the vast majority of those that are involved with the sport, and/or truly care about the Game have a problem with this issue and will continue to voice their thoughts on how it should be represented. It’s not just white moms.

      Grow the Game, not the stereotype.